Tampa Bay area #19 in U.S. fit city rankings

TAMPA, Fla. (WFLA) – The Tampa Bay area may be a great place to enjoy outdoor activities, but Tampa Bay failed to make the top 10 when it comes to fitness rankings.

The twin cities of Minneapolis-St.Paul are the most fit cities, according to the 2017 American Fitness Index rankings. Coming in the #2 slot was Washington, DC, followed by San Francisco, Seattle and San Jose.

The Tampa Bay area ranked 19 in the American Fitness Index rankings.

Other Florida metropolitan areas that made it into the rankings include Miami at 23, Orlando at 25, and Jacksonville at 35. See the entire list here.

The American College of Sports Medicine and the Anthem Foundation releases the rankings each year. The rankings are based on a composite of preventative health behaviors, levels of chronic disease conditions and community resources and policies that support physical activity.

Here are the components that the AFI Data Report measures in its annual report-

Personal Health Indicators

  • Percent any physical activity or exercise in the last 30 days – Regular exercise is important for optimal health and fitness.
  • Percent meeting CDC aerobic activity guidelines – ACSM recommends that all healthy adults ages 18 to 65 years need moderate-intensity aerobic physical activity for at least 30 minutes on five days each week or vigorous-intensity aerobic physical activity for at least 20 minutes on three days each week
  • Percent meeting both CDC aerobic and strength activity guidelines – ACSM recommends that all healthy adults ages 18 to 65 years need moderate-intensity aerobic physical activity for at least 30 minutes on five days each week or vigorous-intensity aerobic physical activity for at least 20 minutes on three days each week
  • Percent eating 2+ fruits per day – The CDC recommends a daily intake of 2 or more fruits for optimal health and fitness.
  • Percent eating 3+ vegetables per day – The CDC recommends a daily intake of 3 or more vegetables for optimal health and fitness.
  • Percent currently smoking – Smoking is harmful to one’s health and can lead to a variety of diseases including cardiovascular disease.
  • Percent obese – Obesity is a precursor to as asthma, diabetes and cardiovascular disease.
  • Percent in excellent or very good health – Individuals answering yes to this criteria are more likely to exercise regularly and eat healthier foods.
  • Any days when physical health, was not good during the past 30 days – Individuals answering yes to this criteria are less likely to exercise regularly.
  • Any days when mental health, was not good during the past 30 days – Individuals answering yes to this criteria are less likely to exercise regularly and eat healthier foods.
  • Percent with asthma – Individuals with asthma are at risk for obesity.
  • Percent with angina or coronary heart disease – Individuals with angina or coronary heart disease are at risk for obesity.
  • Percent with diabetes – Individuals with diabetes are at risk for obesity.
  • Death rate/100,000 for cardiovascular (CV) disease – Provides an estimate of how this disease impacts a community. The second measure of CV disease helps reinforce the “percent with angina or coronary heart disease” figure.
  • Death rate/100,000 for diabetes – Provides an estimate of how this disease impacts a community. The second measure of diabetes helps reinforce the “percent with diabetes” figure.

Community/Environmental Indicators

  • Parkland as a percent of MSA land area – Indicates that there is a safe and affordable place for the community to be physically active.
  • Acres of parkland/1,000 – A second measure of safe and affordable places to be physically active.
  • Farmers’ markets/1,000,000     – Assumes individuals have access to the freshest fruits and vegetables with the most vitamins and nutrients.
  • Percent using public transportation to work     – Individuals have to walk to and from stops and stations. Fewer automobiles also make for improved air quality.
  • Percent bicycling or walking to work    – These activities indicate an individual gets regular exercise.
  • Walk Score® – Directly relates to the availability of safe, convenient and affordable places for residents to be physically active.
  • Percent within a 10 minute walk to a park – Access to safe places to be physically active.
  • Ball diamonds/10,000 – Access to safe places to be physically active.
  • Dog parks/10,000 – Assumes the owner walks with their dog.
  • Park playgrounds/10,000 – Access to safe places to be physically active.
  • Golf courses/100,000 – Access to safe places to be physically active.
  • Park units/10,000 – Access to safe places to be physically active. More small parks indicate these areas are available to more of the community.
  • Recreation centers/20,000 – Access to safe places to be physically active.
  • Swimming pools/100,000 – Access to safe places to be physically active.
  • Tennis courts/10,000 – Access to safe places to be physically active.
  • Park-related Expenditures per Capita – Indicates that a community is providing a safe and affordable place to be physically active. Community is also keeping these areas well maintained.
  • Level of State Requirement for PE classes – This is a reflection on the community’s public policy towards the promotion of physical activity.

According to ACSM, the intent of the American Fitness Index is to provide a valid and reliable measure of the health and community fitness at the metropolitan level in the United States.

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