After Sen. Elizabeth Warren silenced, Internet gets loud

Holding a transcript of her speech in the Senate Chamber, Democratic Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts reacts to being rebuked by the Senate leadership and accused of impugning a fellow senator, Sen. Jeff Sessions, R-Ala., the attorney general nominee, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Feb. 8, 2017. Warren was barred from saying anything more on the Senate floor about Sessions after she quoted from an old letter from Martin Luther King Jr.'s widow about Sessions. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
Holding a transcript of her speech in the Senate Chamber, Democratic Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts reacts to being rebuked by the Senate leadership and accused of impugning a fellow senator, Sen. Jeff Sessions, R-Ala., the attorney general nominee, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Feb. 8, 2017. Warren was barred from saying anything more on the Senate floor about Sessions after she quoted from an old letter from Martin Luther King Jr.'s widow about Sessions. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

WASHINGTON (NEXSTAR MEDIA) — If you’ve turned on the news today, you surely didn’t miss the uproar surrounding Sen. Elizabeth Warren’s (D-Mass.) controversial silencing from further Senate debates on Sen. Jeff Sessions (R-Ala.) pending confirmation as Attorney General by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.)

“I’m just trying to do my job,” Sen. Warren told Nexstar correspondent Alex Schuman today on Capitol Hill.

According to McConnell, Warren violated the Senate rule against “impugning” another senator—essentially, she questioned his moral character—by reading a 30-year-old letter about Sessions written by Coretta Scott King, widow of Martin Luther King Jr., opposing his nomination to a federal judgeship.

“She was warned. She was given an explanation. Nevertheless, she persisted,” McConnell comment on the incident. Now, he probably wishes he could eat those words, as they have become

Now, he probably wishes he could eat those words, as they have become a rallying cry for Warren’s supporters as well as Civil Rights and women’s rights activists in general.

Memes and inspirational photos emblazoned with his words have exploded across the Internet.

“The idea that reading a letter from Coretta Scott King somehow puts me out of line—they didn’t say anything she said was wrong, they just said, ‘you’re not allowed to quote her,'” Warren explains. “So that’s part of the reason I posted it on my Facebook, tweeted it out and live-streamed it. I hope everybody reads her letter. It’s a statement about how important is to be involved in our government.”

The incident even spawned a few hashtags on Facebook and Twitter: #ShePersisted and #LetLizSpeak.

Warren even got an e-shoutout from Hillary Clinton, who has remained relatively silent after losing the presidential election last November.

While Sessions was ultimately confirmed on Wednesday night, Sen. Warren’s mark on America’s rocky political climate will surely live on.

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