Zika Virus Update: New cases and what you can do to prevent it

This 2006 photo provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows a female Aedes aegypti mosquito in the process of acquiring a blood meal from a human host.
This 2006 photo provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows a female Aedes aegypti mosquito in the process of acquiring a blood meal from a human host.

(WFLA) — As the Zika Virus continues to spread around the world, WFLA News Channel 8 has the latest statistics.

Zika Case Count: As of November 23, there were more than 37,100 confirmed cases of Zika virus in U.S. States and Territories.

  • 4,444 confirmed cases of Zika in U.S. States and District of Columbia.
  • 32,724 confirmed cases of Zika in U.S. Territories.

Pregnant women with evidence of Zika virus: As of November 17, there were more than 3,600 pregnant women with evidence of Zika virus.

  • 1,114 pregnant women in U.S. States and District of Columbia.
  • 2,561 pregnant women in U.S. Territories.

Our communities can help to prevent Zika in our area. Some tips are: avoid mosquito bites with repellant, plan for safe travel and protect yourself during intercourse.

On Monday, CDC posted a Zika virus travel notice for Montserrat. CDC has issued travel notices (level 2, “practice enhanced precautions”) for people traveling to destinations with Zika.

On Tuesday, CDC updated guidance for people who travel to or live in the previously identified 4.5-square-mile area in Miami Beach, FL. The North Miami Beach-designated area is no longer considered to be an area of active Zika virus transmission (red area). It is now designated as a Zika cautionary area (yellow area).

Also on Tuesday, CDC researchers announced that they investigated the first series of infants with laboratory evidence of congenital Zika virus infection documented to have onset of microcephaly after birth.The report describes 13 infants in Brazil with congenital Zika virus infection who did not have microcephaly at birth, but later experienced slowed head growth.

Fo more updates on Zika follow WFLA News Channel 8 on Facebook.

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