Solar advocates ask Florida high court to halt voting

FILE - In this April 29, 2013, file photo, Jon Kirkpatrick carries a solar panel up to Bevan Walker for an installation for SunCommon in Montpelier, Vt. The Vermont attorney general’s office issued a warning letter to solar industry players in December 2015 saying some could face penalties for deceptive advertising if they are not clear when consumers are buying electrons but not environmental benefits. SunCommon, Vermont’s largest seller of community solar, is taking renewable energy credits tied to community solar projects and selling those credits to utilities in Massachusetts and Connecticut so they can meet state renewable energy quotas. It’s commonplace and legal for companies and governments to swap energy credits. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot, File)
FILE - In this April 29, 2013, file photo, Jon Kirkpatrick carries a solar panel up to Bevan Walker for an installation for SunCommon in Montpelier, Vt. The Vermont attorney general’s office issued a warning letter to solar industry players in December 2015 saying some could face penalties for deceptive advertising if they are not clear when consumers are buying electrons but not environmental benefits. SunCommon, Vermont’s largest seller of community solar, is taking renewable energy credits tied to community solar projects and selling those credits to utilities in Massachusetts and Connecticut so they can meet state renewable energy quotas. It’s commonplace and legal for companies and governments to swap energy credits. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot, File)

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP) – Solar advocates are asking Florida’s high court to halt voting on Amendment 1, a ballot measure they argue is misleading.

The legal challenge was filed Wednesday with the Florida Supreme Court.

It comes after a leading proponent of Amendment 1 was recorded saying that the measure was written to appear pro-solar, even though it could end up restricting solar growth in Florida by raising costs.

Solar advocates are also asking the court to revisit its previous ruling, which found that Amendment 1’s language was not misleading.

Sarah Bascom, spokeswoman for a utility-funded group that supports the amendment, called the legal challenge “political grandstanding” and said the amendment will protect consumers.

Amendment 1 seeks to change the state constitution to say consumers shouldn’t “subsidize” solar growth.

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